Click the name of the class to see details and register. Prices include all fees. Space is limited so be sure to register now. The shop will open for payment at 9:00 p.m. on August 9, 2015.

9:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m
Appalachian Hearth Broom (Besom) Making:
Teacup Pincushion
Introduction to Support Spinning with a Mirkwood Arts Spindle
Spinning with a Drop Spindle
Spinning Various Wool Types
Learning to Twine
(Rag Rug)

Knit the Dreambird Shawl
Advanced Rigid Heddle Weaving Techniques
Saori Weaving Sold Out
Needle Felted Reindeer
Going Green: How to produce lasting, vibrant greens with natural dyes
Shibori Love Silk (and Indigo) $43
Saori Weaving (2nd Session added) SOLD OUT

Robin Goatey
Maker and Guide in Traditional Folkways. Student of Folklore. Teaching traditional skills for ‘The World Made by Hand’. has been in business since 1987 and online since 2000. We make tools for Folkways Artisans and provide ‘Northern Folk-school’ instruction

Katelyn Dunn
Although only twenty-three years old, has been involved in the fiber arts community for many years.  She first fell in love with fiber arts at the age of eleven when she learned how to knit, and as she says, “It ‘spun’ out of control from there!”  After discovering knitting, Katelyn became captivated by her newfound medium.  She was determined to learn as much as she could about the entire process.  Katelyn’s fiber art now starts at the beginning, or as she says, “I start with the sheep.”  Katelyn does most of the fiber processing herself including cleaning, dyeing, combing, spinning, knitting, crochet, weaving, and felting her fiber to create the finished product.  She now owns her own fiber arts studio, Dunn Spunn, and has been a guest teacher and demonstrator for many stores and events.  Katelyn’s philosophy when teaching fiber arts is “It’s just fluff,” and she loves having the opportunity to be able to share her passion with others.

Janet Deutmeyer
Having started spinning about 7  years ago, Janet has yet to meet a fiber she doesn’t like. Her small herd of fiber alpacas got her involved in the Master Spinner’s Program and she is now a Level 5 student. When not spinning she’s thinking about fiber and spinning

Sue Gazell
Sue began spinning on a wheel, but soon learned that spinning with a spindle had its advantages. It’s more portable, less complicated, and less costly than a wheel.  She rarely met a spindle she didn’t like, and thus grew a collection and passion for spindles of all styles.

Amanda Roberts
Amanda Roberts of Wild Hair Studio is a shepherd and fiber artist.  Support spinning attracted her attention because of the options it gave for shorter and finer fibers, while still easily portable. She is proficient with both drop spindle and support spindle spinning and is the designer of Wild Hair Studio’s The Colorways of Middle Earth Batt series.

Gina Levesque
Artist Gina Levesque has been working in traditional fiber arts since a young girl. Gina works with natural dye stuffs, weaving, rug hooking, spinning, and traditional penny rug construction. Due to her love of the outdoors and training as a biologist, she finds the natural world to be the greatest influence on her work. She remains true to the roots of these traditional fiber arts by incorporating some recycled materials into her finished pieces. Many times she works with wool to create her one-of-a-kind pieces.

Although primarily self taught, she has also attended numerous workshops and classes with noted master dyers and instructors such as Michelle Whipplinger (Earth Hues), Lisel Orlend, and Laura Strand.

As an instructor, she has conducted classes, workshops, demonstrations, and given lectures on natural dyes at various locations throughout the country. She has taught classes in natural dyeing and shibori at numerous venues including City Arts Center (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma), Multi Arts Studio (Stillwater, Oklahoma), The Fiber Event (Greencastle, Indiana), Fiber Christmas (Kelleyville, Oklahoma), Middle Tennessee Fiber Festival (Dickson, Tennessee) Project WILD Regional Facilitators Workshop (Kansas), and Wool Fest (Washington, Indiana) as well as lecturing to numerous quilting, spinning, and rug hooking groups on the topic.

Her fiber art business, Across Generations, provides supplies and beginning projects to those interested in rug hooking, penny rugs, and natural dyeing. Gina holds memberships in The Tulsa Rug Hooking Guild, The Tulsa Handweavers Guild, Murrell Home Fiber Arts Guild, and Natural Dyes International.

Gayle Roberts
Gayle Roberts of Wild Hair Studio has been an artist for over 25 years.  She is a Pricilla Hauser Accredited Decorative Painting Teacher and an accomplished artist in several mediums.  She has years of teaching experience and has offered classes and workshops in a variety of different media, including painting, basket weaving, and felting.  Currently, her focus is on fiber arts, primarily needle felting. The fiber she uses is raised on the family farm.  Wild Hair Studio carries wool from their flock of purebred Romeldale/CVM sheep, consisting of a selection of rovings and fleeces.

Jonee Davis
Jonee relocated to Missouri approx 10 years ago from Arizona. She has been active in the fiber arts since 1991. She first learned to weave then took up spinning.  She is also an avid crocheter while dabbling in all the other aspects relating to fibers. She feels that we are never too young or too old learn new things about the world of fiber arts and loves to share.

Mimi Kezer
After pursuing music and worship arts for 20 years, Mimi Kezer has spent the last six years teaching, encouraging and empowering knitters in their own creative pursuits. From instructing in local yarn shops to fiber festivals to her own video tutorials, this self-described “technique maven” relishes making the complex simple and enabling knitters to walk in new places of confidence in their work. Mimi also designs for her own knitting line, Pastiche Knitwear, and is addicted to making colorful, beautiful things.

Sarah Dauro
Sarah has been involved with arts and crafts for most of her life and has done everything from needlework to stained glass but she focuses predominantly on fiber arts including spinning, knitting, and, of course, weaving.

Finding Saori was a game changer for Sarah. Before Saori, life was about spinning the perfect lace weight yarn and knitting the most beautiful lacy gray shawl. Since Saori, Sarah’s eyes have been opened to the wonders of art yarn, the beautiful colors of the rainbow and beyond, and the imperfect perfection of weaving your heart.

Meredith Kermicle
Meredith is the owner of The Knaughty Knitter, the yarn store here in the ‘Boro. She has been knitting and crocheting since childhood, and learned to weave 15 years ago. She has been teaching knitting, weaving and other fiber arts for 9+ years.

Jan Quarles
A professor of communications some of the time, with the favorite hours in my daily life I’ve been spinning and playing with color since the 1970s. Now I channel my love of color into Daily Fibers, my small business. I’ve learned a lot from Lynne Vogel and other teachers I have studied with, and I love to share that knowledge (it kinda comes naturally!)

Denise Prince
Award-winning jewelry designer Denise Prince’s lifelong interest in fiber arts took her on a journey through many of handicrafts of the genre.  When she found SAORI weaving she knew she had found her way home.
Her journey with SAORI Weaving has brought her a new outlook on life and art.  She is eager to share her love of SAORI weaving you. In her home studio in Peachtree City, GA, Denise teaches weaving, holds fiber related workshops, and holds SAORI-kai—a time for sharing your SAORI journey with other SAORI travelers.
Denise spent February 2013 in Japan studying with Kenzo Jo and his teachers at SAORInoMori.  While there she passed levels 3, 2, and A from the Saori Hand Weavers Testing Association.  She  is currently working towards level 1 and looking forward to a return trip to Japan.



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